Feb.12-Winter Bike to Work Day!

Weather: Mainly cloudy with 60 percent chance of flurries. Wind becoming southwest 30 km/h gusting to 50 this morning. High minus 6°C (wind chill -21). Flurries ending this evening then clearing. Local blowing snow this evening. Wind northwest 40 km/h gusting to 60. Low minus 23. Wind chill minus 38.

Consistent Attire: As previously discussed.

Variable Attire based on the temperature: long-sleeved jersey dress, and Bula balaclava.

Today is the last day of my first week at my new job.  It was also winter bike to work day.  Friday, February 12th, 2016 was the 4th annual international Winter Bike to Work Day as established by http://winterbiketoworkday.org/ almost 10,000 people around the globe committed on line to the ride, including me!

The ride was very “fresh”, well maybe cold, but completing it made me feel that I accomplished something.  My new colleagues at work are likely wondering if I they are now working with a crazy lady 🙂

The extra 1.3 km of commute is not much, but in the morning it feels like an eternity!  I don’t know why this is.  I just keep telling myself to keep calm and peddle on 🙂

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I am leaving tomorrow for a week of ‘fun-in-the-sun’ with my 20 year old son.  The golf links in the Dominican Republic are calling to us.  Upon my return I am speaking at the Ontario Good Roads Association Conference on building bicycle friendly communities.  If you are at the Conference and a follower of this blog be sure to drop into the workshop and say hello.

Signing out until February 25. CHEERS!

 

No No Don’t Make Me Go!

Week 3 – Day 3 – January 19, 2016

IMG_20160112_114257Weather: -5°C (with wind chill -13°C), Cloudy. 30 percent chance of flurries early this morning. A few flurries beginning near noon. Wind becoming west 20 km/h near noon. Roads were clear on the way to the office and snow covered with tracks bare.  The bike space was completely snow covered.

Consistent Attire: As previously discussed.

Variable Attire based on the temperature: MEC thermal arm coverings, sleeveless dress, Bula balaclava and wool felt jacket.

For reasons I cannot explain I did not want to mount the bike seat today! I had to work from home in the morning because I had a contractor doing work at the house. I think my hibernation instincts kicked in and I really, Really, REALLY wanted to give into them.

Words cannot describe how I laboured to put on my cycling gear and make my way up (because everything is up hill right?) my street.  Thankfully the major streets to work were clear and that helped improve the riding effort.

In the same vein as, “what goes up must come down”; upon riding to work, I must also ride home.  Therefore I give much less thought to whether or not I wish to ride at the end of the working day.  It snowed much of the afternoon so for the ride home the cycling space was snow covered.  I like riding in the snow, but navigating through vehicle tracks is very tricky.  The bicycle tires are drawn into the track and exiting the track is very hard.  It is especially difficult in the spaces where the busses pull over to pick up and drop off passengers.  Any snow that might be caught in the bus wheel wells typically release from the effort of starting and stopping adding a few more obstacles for a winter cyclist.

To my friends who are automobile drivers I would like to share with you that if you think you are teaching me a lesson by crowding me and scaring the life out of me? Please know, I am not giving in to your tactics but I am taking down your licence plate number. With Love, Diane

1m Passing Law Applies in the Winter

Week 2 – Day 4 – January 14, 2016

Weather: -10°C (-18°C with wind chill) snow.  Roads were snow covered.  Bike lanes in the morning were snow covered with slushy sections especially around bus stop locations.

Consistent Attire: As per previous posts.

Variable Attire based on the temperature: Leggings (Costco), and a dress with full-length sleeves. Notice I am starting to layer less and less?  I am really learning how much heat I personally generate while riding.

Bikes still belong and the Ontario one-metre passing law still applies in the winter.  Over the past two days I have observed three kinds of motor vehicle operators.  The first is the “old school” who will drive into oncoming traffic to provide adequate clearance for a cyclist. The second is the one who will crowd a cyclist and where possible drive in the marked bicycle lane.  The third is the one who drives “just right” 🙂

For all those non-cyclists motor vehicle operators who just might be reading this Blog there is great news for you! Clear guidance on how to share-the-road the road with a bicycle is provided in the Ontario Highway Traffic Act http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/safety/bicycle-safety.shtml.  Here are the details:

One-Metre Passing Law:

Q1: What is the penalty to drivers for not leaving a minimum of one-metre distance when passing a cyclist?

The penalty for not leaving a minimum one-metre passing distance is a set fine of $85.00 plus a $5 court fee plus a $20 victim surcharge fine for a total payable of $110.00.

Drivers who contest their ticket by going to court may face a fine of up to $500 if found guilty (fine range is $60 to $500). Upon conviction, two demerit points will also be assigned against the individual’s driver record.

Q2: Will cyclists also be required to leave a minimum one-metre distance when passing a vehicle?

Cyclists are not required to leave a specific one-metre space; however, they are required to obey all the rules of the road.   Cyclists who are being overtaken should turn out to the right to allow the vehicle to pass.

Q3: What if there isn’t enough room to allow for a one-metre passing distance?  Can a vehicle cross the centre median line to pass the cyclist?

A motorist may, if done safely, and in compliance with the rules of the road, cross the centre line of a roadway in order to pass a cyclist. If this cannot be done, he or she must wait behind the cyclist until it is safe to pass.

For clarity the above law applies to the roads year around and not just for spring, summer and fall months where roads may seem more supportive of cycling as a commuting choice.

I know that we all feel that our lives are too short to slow down and share-the-road, but the truth is a decrease in 10 km/hour of speed across a 1 or 2 km road way typically adds less than a minute to you drive and may save a life.

Today the roads were completely snow covered and the ride was slow because it was very technical.  Just like a car, the Batpod has more control when I ride more slowly.  I had a scary moment today when I was passed by a vehicle which chose to crowd me by driving into the marked and visible bicycle lane.  They continued to drive in the marked and visible bicycle lane for a long way.   I was also passed by a few folks who, even with a lot of room, chose to operate their vehicle inside the 1 metre passing area.  If I was operating my bicycle in the middle of the road I might understand these choices (well actually I would not understand them) but I was riding in a clearly visible, marked bicycle lane.

Having been hit by two cars in the past, these few vehicle operators unnerved me a bit today so I rode through some parking lots to get to work. 🙂 My resilience was tested.  I passed and I feel great about it!

BIKES BELONG…

While driving with my 85 year old father a while back we got to talking about cycling. Dad commented that there is always that “age old debate” on whether you should cycle on the road or on the sidewalk. I replied that there is no debate and that the Ontario Highway Traffic Act is clear. Bicycles are vehicles and are required to ride on the road. I went on to say that they are also required to ride with traffic or in other words in the same direction as a car.

I find myself wondering when it was that it was ever deemed to be ok to ride a bicycle on a sidewalk such that people think that is where bikes belong. In addition, the majority of all vehicle collisions occur at intersections, therefore riding on a sidewalk does nothing to prevent this conflict. In many cases, cyclists riding on a sidewalk often ride facing traffic resulting in a collision because they did not stop for a pedestrian cross-walk.

People also believe that bikes belong on the right hand side of the road and nowhere else. In times past where the majority of urban roadways were single traffic lanes in each direction, it was easy to ride on the right hand side and nowhere else. However, with urban roads now containing dedicated left turn lanes and dedicated right turn lanes cyclists are required to ride “in traffic”. Some motor vehicle operators chose not to understand that this is where bikes belong. I say chose because that is exactly what it is. They are making a choice to not “share the road”.

We can spend a ton of time arguing about the rights of the road, but to what end? For those who require the language, it is an offense to fail to share the road with a bicycle. More importantly, I believe we need to want to live in community with others. We need to want to share the road.