About dianelfreeman

Engineer and City of Waterloo Councillor interested in leadership in Sustainable Communities.

Community building unites us in improving quality of life

Waterloo Chronicle Article – March 18, 2019

I am thrilled to have the opportunity to be a columnist.  I plan to use this space to explore ways that together, as a city and a community, we can grow as a place where everyone feels like someone really cares. 

I believe that if we truly cared more about one another, then we would care to drive through neighbourhoods at or below the speed limit; that we would want to be the house with the ice-free sidewalk;and that we would see sharing our roads with all road users as an expectation.

I grew up on a crescent in Woodstock, Ontario.  I remember so vividly the “make shift” BBQs that organically occurred, where lawn chairs, children and adults migrated into a neighbours yard.  These get togethers fostered a strong sense of safety and well-being.  We knew when our neighbours were traveling and if we needed to shovel their driveway.  We knew when someone was sick because they had not been seen walking around the block.  We knew if someone had received bad news or a death in the family; then food was made with love and delivered to show both solidarity and support. 

Loneliness and isolation is a growing concern in Canada and we need to find ways to see, hear and talk to one another.  

In 2018, City of Waterloo Council approved the city’s first neighbourhood strategy. This plan “encourages neighbour interaction, empowers residents to lead and commits the city to an enabling corporate culture.”  I am so encouraged by my new colleagues on council who, during the budget conversation, said we need to support this work, fund it and make it happen.  

What excites me the most about the neighbourhood strategy is that it was developed by neighbours for neighbours.  While there is certainly, a role for the city related to implementation, the strategycreates a vision for resident-led neighbourhood community building. Essentially, this strategy encourages the city to support volunteer capacity building and then “get out of the way”.  We need to let those leaders do what they do best and strengthen their neighbourhoods through organizing neighbourhood specific events for people to gather , share experiences, meet one another, make new friends, and learn new things.

On March 4, council approved the Uptown Public Realm Strategy.  I hope residents have a chance to look at this document.  Many citizens participated in building the strategy and it speaks directly to how uptown can continue to transform with a clear focus on creating places and spaces for people to be.  I firmly believe that we need to find ways to interact with each other in such a way that people feel apart of a bigger community.  It is my hope that through implementation of the uptown public realm strategy Waterloo willcontinue to view uptown as a unique place that fosters togetherness, encourages people to go out, walk a dog and enjoy the sunshine. 

Most importantly, I hope uptown, like our neighbourhoods, will be a place where we can find a way, everyday, to pause, see one another, say hello and demonstrate how much we care.

Diane Freeman, P.Eng., FEC, FCAE, Councillor, Ward 4, City of Waterloo 

Career Insight Event – Lester B. Pearson

Professional Engineers talking to students about careers in Engineering

Jason Kipfer of Eastbridge Business Connections, “hit it out of the park” with his home run “Career Insights from Industry Professionals”  event at Lester B. Pearson Public School on Wednesday March 6, 2019.

The day was divided into two parts, where the first saw over 40 mentors providing three 30 minute industry-themed classroom discussions. Students moved from class to class and heard from one of the 12 industry specific panels.

The students then relocated to the gymnasium where they listened to two featured panel discussions “investment in education”, and “the big picture”.

I was thrilled to participate in the Engineering mentors panel along with four others.

Thanks Jason!

Waterloo City Councillor will be criss-crossing the country sharing ways municipalities can fight climate change – Record Article, January 29, 2019

City of Waterloo Coun. Diane Freeman has been named one of four municipal “climate champions” by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities. – Peter Lee , Waterloo Region Record

WATERLOO — As municipalities across Canada work to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change, a local politician will help guide those discussions.

City of Waterloo Coun. Diane Freeman has been named one of four municipal “climate champions” by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities. She plans to highlight local actions to demonstrate ways cities and towns can contribute in the fight against a warming planet.

“I’m very excited. I see a real opportunity for the Region of Waterloo to be showcased across Canada with regard to our climate change efforts as a city and a region,” said Freeman. “And I look forward to working with the stakeholders in our region to be a messenger of their great work.”

That includes local projects like the conversion of tens of thousands of local street lights to more efficient LED technology, the construction of Evolv1 (Canada’s first net-positive, zero-carbon office building) and grassroots organizations such as Sustainable Waterloo Region and the environmental charity Reep Green Solutions.

According to the federation, Freeman and the other three climate champions will “share knowledge and expertise with fellow elected officials in communities of all sizes and speak at events across the country.” They will “aim to inspire and support peers taking climate action in communities from coast to coast to coast.”

Last year, the Region of Waterloo and the cities of Kitchener, Waterloo and Cambridge unanimously endorsed a target of reducing greenhouse gas reduction by 80 per cent by 2050. According to Climate Action WR, the region reduced emissions by 5.2 per cent between 2010 and 2015 — the equivalent of taking nearly 60,000 cars off the road.

UN report released in October found global emissions must drop by 45 per cent before 2030 and reach net zero emissions by 2075 to avoid surpassing the 1.5 C increase in global temperatures now considered the “safe” upper limit of global warming.

The problem is more complicated than simply reducing emissions, though, as some climate change impacts, such as more intense storms, are already occurring. A study released in November found that Canadian municipalities need to do a better job developing climate change adaptation strategies.

The three other municipal leaders are Taylor Bachrach, mayor of Smithers, B.C., former City of Ottawa councillor David Chernushenko, and Laval Coun. Virginie Dufour.

Freeman had to apply to the position and submit a resume, and was also interviewed. She won’t be paid for the role but will be reimbursed for her expenses.

First elected to city council in 2006, representing Ward 4, Freeman has been on the board of the Association of Municipalities of Ontario and the Share the Road cycling coalition, where she helped deliver Ontario’s first bike summit. That summit led to the creation of the Bicycle Friendly Community Awards in Ontario in 2010, and the first provincial cycling strategy.

The City of Waterloo is one of three gold ranked cycling communities in the province, along with Ottawa and Toronto. Kitchener is ranked silver and Cambridge is bronze.

Freeman said she has been a champion for building accessible communities by planning, funding and installing sidewalks, trails and dedicated bicycle infrastructure, all of which reduces the municipal reliance on cars or trucks.

She is also a professional engineer and was president of Professional Engineers Ontario in 2010-201

jjackson@therecord.com

jjackson@therecord.com

The on-line article can be found at: https://www.therecord.com/news-story/9148470-waterloo-city-councillor-will-be-criss-crosing-the-country-sharing-ways-municipalities-can-fight-climate-change/

Some December 2018 Updates:

Interested in knowing what is happening on the active transportation front in City of Waterloo? Subscribe to the quarterly newsletter called Cycling the City at: https://tinyurl.com/y7tnw9k9

Mark your Calendars! for the following FREE Community Events:

More information on Great Events can be found at:

Active Transportation Investments Build Accessible Communities

Cities do not build active transportation corridors for cyclists, they build them for people.  When you take the time to actually spend time on the off-road network of trails and dedicated multi-use trails you will observe that the majority of users are pedestrians; people jogging, walking and individuals pushing strollers, exercising dogs, using accessibility devices like wheelchairs, walkers and canes and overall, people seeking to maintain and improve their health.  The investment in these spaces is not typically property tax supported, but Gas Tax supported.  If you want to take a “pot-shot” at cyclists you could say they don’t pay into the Gas tax, but the evidence is clear; the majority of cyclists are also vehicle owners/users.

When we look at on-road cycling infrastructure here are a few facts for consideration:

  1. Painting a bike lane on a road achieves some important and valuable things including:
    • Traffic “calming” by narrowing the travel lane for cars.
    • Reminding all road users how to share the road.
    • Buffering traffic from pedestrians on the sidewalk. This dramatically improves the pedestrian experience especially on roads that have no boulevard.
  2. Paint is cheap. The City’s budget for road painting is driven primarily by the increase in the overall road network then by painting a few sections with a “bike lane”.
  3. Most cycling advocates will tell you that painting a white line is not considered cycling infrastructure. In many cases, especially on rural roads, the white line is designating the road edge as opposed to creating a “bike lane”.

As someone who had been involved in two motor vehicles collisions, I know that I am only a temporarily able bodied person (TAP), all of us are TAPs.  For many, the Active Transportation corridors provide people with independence to get from one place to another because they are not car owners or drivers.  Imagine telling people 100 years ago that we were going to invest millions to build dead end roads that serve ten homes; they would think we were wasting their property tax dollars for certain.

There are many, many times I see and cycle on roads where there is not a single car in sight, but you know what? The city built those roads. Why? Because it was the right thing to do!

Cycling Canada’s National Capital with “Polly” pakIT

Ottawa Ontario is Canada’s National Capital .  It is located in the east of southern Ontario, near the city of Montréal and the U.S. border.  Sitting on the Ottawa River, it has at its centre Parliament Hill, with grand Victorian architecture and museums such as the National Gallery of Canada, with noted collections of indigenous and other Canadian art. The park-lined Rideau Canal is filled with boats in summer and ice-skaters in winter. It is easily accessed by automobile, train, Airplane, bus or pakIT :-).IMG_20170616_1356495

In June 2017, I attended a conference hosted by the Governor General of Canada (His Excellency David Johnston).  The Conference was for Alumni of the Governor General’s Canadian Leadership Conference.  If you do not know about this Conference be sure to check it out at www.leadershipcanada.ca.

This was my first opportunity to fly with my Bike Friday pakIT (AKA Polly). This was the perfect journey to see if Polly was everything I hoped she would be and, quite honestly, one of the major reasons that I purchased a pakIT.  I custom built Polly to be as light as possible while still meeting my performance expectations.  I chose not to put a pannier rack of any sort also to reduce weight.  So here is how it went…

  1. Packing my pakIT: You know how they say, “The first time is always the hardest”? Well it is true. I watched the Ron Paulk packing video what seemed like a million times but I still spent the better part of 3 hours figuring out how to pack Polly, my helmet, clothing and the necessities for 3 days in Ottawa.  Remember, I was attending a Leadership conference, Lycra bike shorts were not on the suitable attire list.  As well, rain was in the forecast so that gear had to come too.  Some things I was glad I did:IMG_20170614_2246374
    1. Bought the pakIT packing kit. The heavy felt and protective tubes for the front forks and for the bike to prevent crushing were all well work the money
    2. Bought a Filzer Mini Roadie floor pump with a built in pressure gauge. Airlines require the tire pressure to be substantively lowered prior to travel.
    3. Placed all my clothes in Large and x-Large heavy-duty Ziploc bags. My pakIT has a rear de-railer and a chain. The potential for grease to get on clothing is high.
    4. Roll clothes into the Ziploc bags and squeeze to remove all of the air. This makes for very small items that can be placed in and around the bike parts
    5. Brought my Timbuk2 Messenger bag. This was the better than a backpack because it minimized coverage on my back and reduced sweating.
    6. Stable but beautiful footwear. I wanted something that was good for walking, looked awesome with a dress and was flat on the pedals.  All my shoes are Fluevogs, so the hardest decision was to bring only one pair 🙂 The Black, white and peach Mini Qtee was the chosen shoe. MINI_qtee-lo
    7. Rain shoes that I can wear with a dress. This is a bit of a tall order, but I have found that Crocs deliver on this front. They are lightweight and can look good, not fancy, but good with a dress.11215_48J_ALT140
  2. Polly meets Air Canada: Prior to leaving home, I weighed the luggage to confirm that I was below the applicable weight limit. I also checked in on-line and pre-paid for my check-in luggage so that upon arrival all I had to do was print the bag tag and head for the Gate.  Some things I was glad I did:
    1. I did not lock my luggage. What is the point? The Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) has a key anyway. This is a clear indication of nothing to “hide”.
    2. I did not declare during the check-in process that my bag contained a bike, because the bag was not oversized, not overweight, and I was not requesting any preferential handling. I suspect this saved me $50-$200 in “up-charges”.
  3. Check-in Experience: At the Airport my bag was weighed. It was likely because of the size of the Samsonite Flite case.
  4. Airport Security: CATSA did open my bag during travel in both directions. This occurred after I checked the luggage and prior to receiving it at the other end (i.e. the inspection was not done in front of me).  I can imagine what a folded and partially dismantled Polly looks like in an X-ray machine so if I were a CATSA agent I would inspect it too. They are just doing their job and I am thankful for the job they do.  They left a note in the bag to inform me of the inspection and that nothing was removed.
  5. Destination Pre-Planning: Some things I was glad I did:
    1. I reviewed the cycling infrastructure on-line prior to travelling so I knew where the bicycle network was relative to my hotel, conference location(s), dining locations, and tourist destination locations.
    2. I know Ottawa very well, so I had advanced knowledge of the City prior to doing my research.
    3. I chose a hotel in the heart of the cycling network and within a comfortable distance to all of my preferred destinations. I really like the hotel too, it is a boutique hotel called the Metcalf located just a few blocks from the Parliament of Canada and a beautiful bike ride away from the By-ward Market, a very popular restaurant district.
    4. I knew that I wanted to unpack Polly in my hotel room so I called ahead and made arrangements for an early check in.
  6. Unpacking: I arrived at the Metcalf Hotel by taxi before 9am and was checked in early as requested. It took me less than 20 minutes to unpack, rebuild, pump the tires and head out on Laurier Avenue on route to the Opening of the Conference at the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau, Quebec.
  7. Managing Polly at my destinations: Security for a conference that involves the attendance of the Governor General of Canada is high, but welcoming. I folded Polly in front of security, picked her up, indicated that no bicycle lock would ever be able to protect the bike and walked in.  I have found security staff to be “the best”.  I asked if they recommended a location to place Polly and explained she could not be locked up because of the nature of the bike, and in every instance, they recommended behind the security desk or within plain sight of it.IMG_20170615_1941269

In the evenings, I enjoyed the foodie nightlife of Ottawa with friends.  I brought the folded Polly into the Restaurants and aside from a few interested looks, it all worked out.

The overall experience of travelling with Polly was so good that I kept thinking something has “got-to-give”, but nothing did.

As a proud Canadian, I cannot pen a blog without crowing about the incredible City of Ottawa.  If you have ever considered travelling to Ottawa this is the year to do it.  2017 marks Canada’s 150 Anniversary as a Country and the Capital is decked out to receive visitors from across Canada and the world.  I worked in Ottawa for a bit and came to love the City in every season.

The City has made significant investments in cycling infrastructure.  It is a “Gold” Bicycle Friendly Community as designated by the Share-the-Road Coalition and the League of American Bicyclists.  There are hundreds of kilometers of off-road, paved bicycle trails.  These trails follow the banks of the Ottawa River and the Rideau Canal.  Most of these trails are cleared in winter months and available if you would like to explore a Canadian Winter by Bike.

In addition to the museums, the Parliament and other Government buildings, there are many destinations to cycle to in Ottawa including “burbs” known as Old Town, Westboro, Little Italy, the Glebe, and Chinatown. Cyclists can also cross into Quebec from Ottawa and connect to the “route verte” where they can travel across the beautiful province of Quebec on a combination of on and off-road trails.

If Ottawa is a destination of choice, pack you pakIT and plan to stay for a while, it is so beautiful I promise, you will not want to leave!

“Polly” pakiT!

It is hard to believe, that a month has passed since my custom made, pakiT arrive.  Yep I picked Pink and White, because I could and because I love how vibrant the colour is.  I have never “named” one of my bikes before, but I really can’t help myself with this one…she is “Polly” pakiT 🙂

Over this past month I have put Polly to the test including flying her to Ottawa on Air Canada.  The performance of this bike is both amazing and unexpected.  I really knew very little about folding bikes but in just one month of riding I have learned a ton!

  1. Dresses work: because of the low frame the bike is perfect for cycle commuting in a dress
  2. Travel Time: Was essentially the same as riding my hybrid
  3. Performance: the bike provides a very solid, steady and comfortable ride.  One Facebook friend asked if it was “wobbly” as it looked like it would be.  The answer was a very clear no.   It does not feel wobbly at all.
  4. The fold: My work colleagues could not help but comment on how small the bike was folded. They are accustomed to seeing my other bikes and were very surprised at the small footprint of the pakiT
  5. Air Travel: that is a story for another Blog.  Suffice to say it worked, it worked better than I could have hoped and I was so happy to have my pakiT with me during a conference in Ottawa, Ontario Canada.
  6. Travel commuting with non-cyclists: The pakiT is the bike of choice when I know I am meeting people and then traveling together by car.  No special bike rack is needed, the pakiT folds and fits in the trunk.

deepfoldPakit

The bike was made, just for me, by “the Green Bike” company in Eugene Oregon.  They are marketed under the brand of Bike Friday.

PakitTag

I would like to expand a bit on the travel time.  The following is from the Bike Friday website and describes the travel distance very well as “Better Gearing”.  The website goes on to say “Small wheels don’t equate to slower speeds, or having to pedal more. What gives you speed when you pedal is the distance that the wheel travels for every full revolution of the pedals, this is called gear inches. It’s understandable to assume that a smaller wheel would have fewer gear inches than a conventional bike, because with the exact same gearing it does. But folding bikes compensate for this by using higher gear ratios. Take for instance a folding road bike like the Pocket Rocket, which uses a 53 tooth chain wheel and 9 tooth cassette cog to achieve 116 gear inches. That’s nearly 10 feet of travel for every full rotation of the pedals, which is just as good, if not better, than any standard full-sized road bike.”

The Bike Friday website also addresses the “wobbly” question as follows “Another feature that makes small wheeled bicycles great for touring or transporting kids is the low center of gravity, which is the balance point of the bicycle. With small wheels, the balance point is naturally lower to the ground, and the lower it is to the ground the more stable it is.”

It was one thing to read the above on the website and quite another to test drive it personally.  I was expecting wobbly, I was expecting that my ride would be slow, I was expecting that this bike would be my travel bike and in between trips be used less…I was wrong on all accounts.  Polly pakiT is so pretty; she is hard to leave behind for any reason!

Pakit

Living a Cycling Life

Along with my good friend Barbara, my husband Peter and I recently travelled to Budapest where we boarded a Viking River Cruise (vikingrivercruisescanada.com).  We sailed up the Danube River stopping in: Bratislava, Slovakia; Vienna, Durnstein, Melk and Linz Austria then ending in Passau, Germany.  Barbara and I are avid cyclists and frequently wanted to rent bicycles during the trip.  We know that touring a city by foot and by bike offer very different viewpoints and a bike can, of course, allow you to travel further, faster.  We spent a day in each destination.  The only location we were able to find a bike rental shop that was near to the harbour was in Passau.  During the trip we tossed about the idea of bringing bikes with us.  My astute husband took note of the conversation and asked me last week if my next bike might be a folding one?  There is a great saying in the world of bikes that the number of bikes you need = n (number of bikes you own) + 1. I said that I was actually thinking about folding bikes after our trip.  He said that he and my two boys have decided that for Mother’s Day 2017 they want to buy me a folding bike for me to take on vacation, in particular ones that involve air travel.  With Barbara’s help, Peter did the heavy lifting with regard to finding the folding bike company he thought I should buy this bike from which is Bike Friday (www.bikefriday.com).

BFFolding

I reviewed the website and of course, immediately fell in love with these bikes.  I was excited about the idea of building my own bike.  I used their on-line design tool and was somewhat scared off by the on-line build price.  They have a “pre-loved” section to their site and those prices looked more approachable so I picked up the phone and called them.  Phoning them was THE RIGHT THING TO DO.  I recommend if you are considering a Bike Friday to just pick up the phone and call them.  Walter, their Sales Consultant & IT Assistant, was the best!  He asked what my budget was and custom built me a pakit.  I was able to discuss and choose all of the components I wanted along with my frame paint colour and decal/wire colours.  They also took all of the measurements related to the most favorite ride I currently own along with my height, weight and age (not sure how age plays into the equation).  I really loved the buying experience with Walter and felt he was keen to ensure I received the bike I wanted at the price I could afford.  I  decided this was going to be the best “girl” bike ever and it will be pink and white!

BikeFriday

Because they custom make every bike I now must wait.  Their turnaround time is 5-8 weeks depending on the availability of parts.  My pakit is scheduled to arrive June 9th.